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Friday, August 1, 2014

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Zachary Schmidt '16

This ongoing series introduces the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows for the 2014-2015 academic year. The Rockefeller Leadership Fellows (RLF) program provides fellows with resources in leadership theories and practical skills. Selected their Junior Spring, these Seniors take part in the workshops, dinner discussions, and team-building exercises as they gain a better understanding of the qualities and responsibilities necessary for leaders and successful leadership styles. Throughout the program, fellows learn from the insight and experience of distinguished guests as well as from each other.

Photo by Courtney Cania

Zachary Schmidt '16 graduated cum laude from the Pembroke Hill School in Kansas City, MO, where he was an Eagle Scout and Captain of the football and wrestling teams. In 2011, Schmidt accepted an appointment as a midshipman to the United States Naval Academy, where he was elected to Academy’s Honor Congress, selected to the Superintendent’s List, and completed occupational training on board a ballistic missile submarine during his freshmen year. After graduating from an Academy-specific National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) development course, Schmidt served as a Training Corporal for underclassmen before taking a semester sabbatical from school his sophomore winter in order to conduct missions work at an orphanage in Uganda. In the fall of 2013, Schmidt matriculated to Dartmouth where he participates with Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Christian Union as he continues to pursue a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Internship Opportunity: Institute for the Study of War

This is an internship opportunity from outside The Rockefeller Center.

Internship applications are now being accepted at the Institute for the Study of War (ISW) in Washington, DC. The Institute for the Study of War advances an informed understanding of military affairs through reliable research, trusted analysis, and innovative education. It is committed to improving the nation’s ability to execute military operations and respond to emerging threats in order to achieve U.S. strategic objectives. ISW is a non-partisan, non-profit, public policy research organization.



Logan Brog '15 is currently serving as an ISW intern in Washington, DC. In regards to the internship he says, "It's a really great chance for Dartmouth students to gain experience in defense and analysis while working with brilliant people, using state-of-the-art technology, and without doing a second of 'busy work.'"

For a full list of internship opportunities, visit the ISW website at: https://www.understandingwar.org/employment

To submit your application, please email your cover letter, resume, a brief writing sample (5 pages maximum, excerpts from longer pieces are acceptable), and unofficial transcript to internships@understandingwar.org with the position name in the title of your email. Please submit your cover letter and resume in one PDF file. Please also submit all files in PDF format ONLY. All internships are unpaid.

The Rockefeller Center occasionally posts opportunities for students to become involved in the political process. Such postings do not constitute an endorsement of the political objectives of any person or organization.

Notes from the Field: Michael Machlin '17

Rockefeller Center-funded interns reflect on their experiences as part of our Notes from the Field series. The Rockefeller Center helps students find, fund, and prepare for a leave-term internship experience in public policy research, public policy analysis, issue evaluation, or activities which help shape and determine public policy.

Student Intern: Michael Machlin '17

Internship Organization:
US Department of the Interior, Office of Environmental Policy and Compliance (OEPC) – San Francisco, CA

How would you describe your employer in one paragraph? What’s the elevator pitch?
My supervisor and mentor, Pat Port, is a Regional Environmental Officer for the OEPC San Francisco office, covering AZ, CA, HI, NV, and the Pacific Territories for environmental policy compliance and coordination issues. She oversees the Environmental Review process developed through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to ensure that all federally associated projects are in compliance with existing environmental regulations. She enjoys looking into current events, particularly politicized and controversial issues, to see how they apply to the environmental policy world.

What are your specific responsibilities in the organization?
I complete important administrative work, including facilitating the Environmental Review process and reviewing National Response Center notifications. For Environmental Reviews, various bureaus such as the National Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management, and the Fish and Wildlife Service provide comments regarding federally associated projects. I oversee the process of compiling those comments to provide to the stakeholders. This process ensures that new projects consider environmental concerns. For National Response Center notifications, I review reports of environmental incidents in the region. These are primarily oil spills. After identifying significant incidents, I report them to local spill response authorities and follow up during the cleanup process. I also work on interest-based projects suggested by my mentor.

How did you feel on the first day of your internship?
I felt comfortable from the start because Pat was supportive of me while simultaneously demonstrating high expectations. In the OEPC office, the current interns train incoming ones instead of Pat doing so herself. Because of this, there was less pressure from the start, and I was able to learn the necessary skills from my new colleagues.

What is your favorite part of the internship so far?
The internship has given me a lot of freedom in terms of individual projects. While the administrative work, Environmental Reviews and National Response Center notifications, offer limited space for creativity, the independent projects allow me to research interesting environmental issues and get in contact with employees from any bureau of the Interior. This allows me to network and make connections with environmental experts in various sub-fields while learning information from the inside. I am currently corresponding with people from the Bureau of Reclamation regarding the pulse flow released in the Colorado River earlier this year. The project was a major success, with the river reaching the sea for the first time in years.

What challenges have you faced so far?
There is a great amount of responsibility associated with the Office’s work. Pat allows us interns to work on many major projects and assignments, so my work is often associated with my supervisor. I hold myself to a high standard throughout my work because I want it to reflect well upon my supervisor and the Office.

What do you hope to achieve by the end of your internship? 
I hope to gain a greater understanding of the environmental policy world,and identify if this is a field I want to enter after graduating from Dartmouth.

What have been some practical lessons you've learned in the day-to-day life of your internship? 
As expected, lunch food in San Francisco is quite expensive. I bring lunch to work as often as feasible to reduce food costs.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Notes from the Field: Maclean Calihan '17

Rockefeller Center-funded interns reflect on their experiences as part of our Notes from the Field series. The Rockefeller Center helps students find, fund, and prepare for a leave-term internship experience in public policy research, public policy analysis, issue evaluation, or activities which help shape and determine public policy.

Student Intern: Maclean Calihan '17

Internship Organization:
American Enterprise Institute (AEI) – Washington, DC  

How would you describe your employer in one paragraph? What’s the elevator pitch?
AEI is a private, nonpartisan, not-for-profit institution dedicated to research and education on issues of government, politics, economics and social welfare. AEI is home to some of America's most accomplished public policy experts and leans to the right politically. It is often hard to measure the influence of a think tank because when policy happens, everyone claims to have influenced it. But AEI testifies and publishes high profile articles more than any other think tank. A good example of a policy that can be directly traced to AEI is "the surge" in Iraq, which was designed by AEI scholars in a conference room that I use every week for meetings.

What are your specific responsibilities in the organization?
I do a lot of different things while working for the Executive Vice President. One of the main projects happening at AEI right now is the renovation of a historic building that will be the new home of AEI in a couple of years. I help with projects and sit in on meetings surrounding this building, from the construction to the architects to the board that has to approve it, and everything else.

How did you feel on the first day of your internship?
I was so nervous on my first day that my hands were shaking. I’ve never had an internship before. But I kept my hands in my lap under the table during orientation with the other new interns. Fortunately, my boss was at a meeting that morning, so I was able to sit at my desk and look through some information that he had emailed me while I calmed down. Throughout my first week, I met many other interns at lunch, and I will miss them when I return to Hanover in the fall.

What is your favorite part of the internship so far?
My favorite part of the internship has been meeting and befriending other interns. We come from relatively diverse backgrounds, but everyone I meet is really interesting and awesome. I also enjoy going to the conferences AEI holds a few times a week on policy issues. I have seen some high profile speakers like John McCain speaking on Iraq and Paul Ryan speaking on social mobility. I work ten feet from the door to former UN Ambassador John Bolton’s office. Next to his office is the office of Paul Wolfowitz, the former president of the World Bank and former Deputy Secretary of Defense. I am sent links of them talking on Fox and CNN every week, but I see them as real people. Simply due to the intangible environment of AEI, I feel much more politically aware than I do in Hanover, and I like it that way.

What challenges have you faced so far?
I suppose my biggest challenge is being alone where I work. Many of the other interns sit with each other, but I am in a cubicle next to John Bolton's secretary. It has been harder for me to befriend the other interns because I simply don't see them. I also fear that I am not taking full advantage of the scholars at AEI because I often don't know what to say to them.

What do you hope to achieve by the end of your internship?
I hope to get a better sense of Washington, DC. I have been doing that thus far, and I hope to get a better sense of how a business is run. Since I work for the Executive VP, my internship is both a policy internship and a business internship.

What have been some practical lessons you've learned in the day-to-day life of your internship?
Cute and appropriate dresses are not as easy to find as they should be. Also, connecting on the DC metro in off-peak hours is a bad idea.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Tatsuro Yamamura '15

This ongoing series introduces the Rockefeller Leadership Fellows for the 2014-2015 academic year. The Rockefeller Leadership Fellows (RLF) program provides fellows with resources in leadership theories and practical skills. Selected their Junior Spring, these Seniors take part in the workshops, dinner discussions, and team-building exercises as they gain a better understanding of the qualities and responsibilities necessary for leaders and successful leadership styles. Throughout the program, fellows learn from the insight and experience of distinguished guests as well as from each other.

Photo by Thanh V. Nguyen
 
Tatsuro Yamamura '15 graduated from The College Preparatory School in Oakland, California where he actively participated in his high school debate team and played tennis. At Dartmouth, Yamamura majors in Economics and Government. He serves as a researcher and Presidential Scholar for the Government Department and as a research assistant at the Tuck Business School. He also serves on the Committee on Standards. After graduation, Yamamura hopes to attend law school or graduate school and work in a field related to tax.